Diesel Trains Icon

British Rail Class 23 Diesel Locomotive

Read more about the iconic ‘Baby Deltics’ and the reasons behind their withdrawal from service in the early 1970s.

Baby Deltics

The British Rail Class 23 Diesel Locomotive was built in a small production run by English Electric in 1959. These Bo-Bo configuration diesel-electric locos featured a single Napier Deltic engine rather than two as used in the Class 55 'Deltic', and were therefore nicknamed the ‘Baby Deltics’.

Reliability

Working in and around London from the late 1950s onwards, they initially proved unreliable, with a high number of engine changes needed. After being moved to Stratford around 1963, their engines were modified and reliability improved.

Withdrawal

The engines were eventually withdrawn between 1968 and 1971 after just 12 years in service. Sadly, because only a handful were originally made, none have survived to preservation.

 
 

Have your say...

Please note: you have to be logged into the site before you can leave a comment

The Baby Deltic Project

Posted on Friday 12th August 2011 | 5:14 PM

To rectify the situation where all the Baby Deltics were scrapped, a group of enthusiasts are converting a class 37 into a baby Deltic with a Napier Deltic engine. There progress can be followed at http://www.thebabydelticproject.co.uk/rfgd

Andrew Wright

 
Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh to London Kings Cross by Train

Book in advance with redspottedhanky.com and save 85% advanced bookings.

From £21.00

Buy now

Millenium Dome, London

Birmingham New Street to London Euston by Train

Book in advance with redspottedhanky.com and save 92% on advance bookings.

From £6

Buy now

You may also like...

 
Twitter

@railcouk

Follow us on Twitter and become part of our rail community!

 
redspottedhanky.com

redspottedhanky.com

redspottedhanky.com is the easy way to buy cheap train tickets online.

 
fuelGenie

fuelGenie

Control your business fuel costs with a supermarket fuel card – free to apply, no ongoing account charges and no monthly minimum spend.